The History of Geocaching: How it All Started!

Geocaching is an outdoor recreational activity that has been around for more than two decades. It is a treasure hunt game where participants use GPS coordinates and clues to find hidden caches. It combines the fun of a scavenger hunt with the challenge of using technology. Geocaching has become increasingly popular as more people have access to GPS technology and are looking for outdoor activities. So, how did it all start? Let us take a look at the history of geocaching.

The History of Geocaching

Geocaching began with the development of the Global Positioning System (GPS) in the mid-1990s. GPS technology was originally used by the military for navigation and targeting, but soon became available to the public. When selective availability was removed on May 2, 2000, GPS accuracy for public use was greatly improved.

A few days later, geocaching was born by Dave Ulmer, a computer consultant in Oregon, who wanted to test the new accuracy. He hid a container in the woods near his home and posted the coordinates on a website. Within just a few days, the container had been found by two people and the activity of geocaching had been born.

Early Geocaching Successes

In the early days of geocaching, there was no dedicated website for posting coordinates and details of caches. Instead, geocachers would post coordinates on message boards, websites, and forums. This made it difficult for geocachers to find caches, but also increased the challenge.

The first dedicated geocaching website was created in September 2000 by Jeremy Irish. This website made it much easier for geocachers to find caches and share information about them. The website quickly grew in popularity and became the go-to resource for geocachers around the world.

Geocaching Today

Today, geocaching is a popular recreational activity enjoyed by millions of people around the world. There are over 3 million active geocaches and more than 10 million geocachers. Geocaching is a great way to explore the outdoors and discover new places.

Geocaching is a great activity for families, friends, and even solo adventurers. There are caches of all types and difficulty levels, so there is something for everyone. If you are looking for a fun way to explore the outdoors, geocaching may be the perfect activity for you.

Interesting Facts About Geocaching

Here are some interesting facts about geocaching:

• Geocaching was originally called the Great American GPS Stash Hunt

• The oldest active geocache (MINGO) was hidden in 2000 and is still active today.

• There are geocaches located in all 50 US states and on all seven continents.

• The word ‘geocache’ was added to the Scrabble dictionary in 2014.

• Groundspeak Headquarters’ is also known as The Lilypad.

• The very first offical Travel Bug was placed in a cache in August 2001.

Geocaching Rules and Etiquette

When geocaching, it is important to follow the rules and etiquette of the activity. Here are some basic rules and etiquette to follow when geocaching:

• Respect the environment and leave no trace of your visit.

• Do not reveal the location of the cache to non-geocachers.

• Sign the physical logbook with your geocaching name.

Conclusion

Geocaching is an outdoor recreational activity that has been around for more than two decades. It is a great way to explore the outdoors and discover new places. It is a fun activity for families, friends, and solo adventurers.

If you are looking for a fun and challenging outdoor activity, geocaching may be the perfect activity for you. So, why not give it a try? Who knows, you may even find the oldest active geocache and make your own geocaching history.

Related Podcast Episodes

S1E3: The History of Geocaching

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